• 2020 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference: Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older AdultsJoin us at the 2020 GAPNA Pharmacology Conference:
    Contemporary Pharmacology and Prescribing in Older Adults

    April 14-18, 2020, Honolulu, HI.

    Earn up to 18 CNE hours.

     

    Find out more about it and REGISTER today!

  • AwardNew for GAPNA members: MCM Education

    GAPNA has partnered with a MCM Education to offer an ongoing series of CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease in Older Adults," is the latest program offered.

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. It is diagnosed based on the presence of two of four motor symptoms including rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and gait imbalance...

    Find out about it!

  • ConventionCALL FOR: Podium and Poster Abstracts

    For the 38th GAPNA Annual Conference
    at the Hyatt Regency
    New Orleans, LA, September 24-26, 2020

    GAPNA members are invited to submit an abstract about their innovative work, that should enrich the APRN's knowledge and/or enhance the care of an older adult.

    Find out more info and deadline dates

  • Poster PresentationONLINE NOW:

    2019 GAPNA Conference Poster Presentations

    Note the latest trends in the care, education, and research of the older adult population.

     

    View the 2019 Poster Presentations from the Annual Conference!

Slower Walking Speed in Elderly May Be Explained by Loss of Muscle Strength and Mass

Elderly people walk at a slower speed and tire more quickly because of loss of strength and mass in leg muscles, according to research published recently in The Journal of Physiology.

Using computer simulations, researchers found these physiological changes explain the slower walking speed preferred by the elderly, and that a focus on building up these leg muscles may be the only effective way to improve elderly walking.

Walking performance, measured in terms of energy efficiency (how far one can travel per calorie consumption) and walking speed, declines as people get older.

The reason for this decline is unknown as aging produces a range of physiological changes which affect gait, but are hard to study individually.

This decline in walking performance can lead to a less active lifestyle, worsening the health of elderly people and is directly linked to a lower 10-year survival rate for people at age 75.

The findings of this study suggest that a focus on strengthening muscles in the legs may be the only effective way to improve elderly walking.

In other words, improving other features such as joint flexibility or walking strategy would not help normal elderly people to walk better.

Read the article / for more info, see Sung & Geyer. (2018). Predictive neuromechanical simulations indicate why walking performance declines with aging. The Journal of Physiology.

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