• 2019 Senior Report Senior Report: Older Americans have more options for home care, but still struggling.

    The United Health Foundation has released results of a sweeping new study benchmarking the health of older adults. The America's Health Rankings® Senior Report was created in partnership with GAPNA to improve the health of America's seniors.

    The data will help advanced practice nurses and other providers deliver quality care.

    Find out about it!

  • FREE continuing education credit is available for the following session:

    "Decisional Capacity"

    (session captured at the GAPNA 2018 Annual Conference)


    For July/August 2019 - Get Your Free CNE Now!

  • Save $90 - Register Now with Early Bird Savings!
    38th Annual GAPNA Conference

    October 3-5, 2019 at the Paris Hotel, Las Vegas, NV.

    Focused education; lasting connections, networking, free access to the GAPNA Online Library.

    Earn up to 22 contact hours (including pre-conference workshops).

    Get more information and register now!

  • AwardNew for GAPNA members: MCM Education

    GAPNA has partnered with a MCM Education to offer an ongoing series of CNE programs available to GAPNA members. "Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease in Older Adults," is the latest program offered.

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. It is diagnosed based on the presence of two of four motor symptoms including rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and gait imbalance...

    Find out about it!

Improving Mobility

Regular Stretching Shown to Improve Muscles in Elderly

Daily muscle stretching could bring health benefits to older people with reduced mobility, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.

Despite the well-known beneficial effects of exercise, the proportion of older people participating in regular exercise programs is low, often due to the strenuous nature of exercise training. In particular, older people with reduced mobility and weak muscles are often less likely to take part in exercise.

Muscle stretching is widely performed as a warm-up or cool-down and is low intensity compared to aerobic exercise. This means that even very old individuals can perform muscle stretching with minimal risk of injury.

Researchers from Florida State University, Kansas State University, and the University of Electro-communications in Tokyo found that regular muscular stretching, when performed five times per week, for 4 weeks, increases blood flow to muscles of the lower leg. They also found regular muscular stretching improves the function of arteries in the muscles of the lower legs, and increases the number of capillaries within stretched muscles.

This suggests that for individuals with limited mobility, regular muscular stretching could improve blood flow to muscles.

This has particularly important implications for older people with lower leg problems for whom walking is difficult due to pain or lack of mobility. Additionally, patients with peripheral artery disease and patients with foot or leg problems related to conditions such as diabetes might be able to use muscular stretching to improve blood flow to their lower limbs and increase or regain walking function.

View for more info: Hotta et al. (2018). Daily muscle stretching enhances blood flow, endothelial function, capillarity, vessel density and connectivity in aged skeletal muscle. The Journal of Physiology.

Plan your trip to the nation’s capital during GAPNA’s Annual Conference, September 26-29, 2018 by checking out all the things to do, places to eat, and ways to have fun.

Find out about it!